Keynotes

Jeanne Bamberger


Jeanne Bamberger

Jeanne Bamberger

Conference Keynote Talk: Shaping Time: Properties and Functions

Monday, August 3, 2015, 1:30pm 
Scarritt Bennett Center

Abstract

The episodes with children that I follow, here, recapitulate in innocent form efforts of philosophers and scientists throughout history to hold time still so as to reflect upon it, to digitize, count, and notate its passing presence. Studying children’s efforts to make descriptions of themselves as well as things in motion, provides us with insight into the critical (silent) transformations through which the know-how of familiar action, becomes the selective know-about that is expressed in symbolic conventions that compress, consolidate, and hold time’s evanescence still.

Biography

Jeanne Bamberger is Professor of Music at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, emerita, where she taught music theory and cognitive aspects of music perception, learning, and development.  She is currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Music Department at UC-Berkeley.  Bamberger’s research is interdisciplinary focusing on perceptual change through the observation and analysis of children and adults in moments of spontaneous learning situations. She was a student of Artur Schnabel and Roger Sessions and has performed in the US and Europe as piano soloist and in chamber music ensembles.   She attended Columbia University and the University of California at Berkeley receiving degrees in philosophy and music theory.  Her most recent books include The mind behind the musical ear  (Harvard University Press, 1995), Developing musical intuitions:  A project based introduction to making and understanding music.  (Oxford University Press, 2000), and Discovering the musical mind (Oxford University Press, 2013).

Dr. Charles Limb


Dr. Charles Limb

Dr. Charles Limb

Public Keynote Lecture: The Neuroscience of Musical Creativity

Saturday, August 1, 2015, 3:30pm at the Vanderbilt Music and Mind Kickoff to SMPC
Ingram Hall, Blair School of Music, Vanderbilt University

Abstract

Musical creativity has existed since the earliest days of human civilization. Until recently, how the brain actually produces musical ideas was poorly understood. Recent advances in brain imaging have allowed us to address questions of artistic significance that were previously felt to be inaccessible to scientific inquiry. Of the multiple creative processes that take place in music, improvisation—the spontaneous generation of musical material—provides an inspiring tool to study these processes. This presentation will highlight several functional neuroimaging studies that have examined the process of musical improvisation in expert musicians, as a window into the complex neural processes that give rise to creativity.

Biography

Dr. Charles Limb is the Francis A. Sooy Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and the Chief of the Division of Otology, Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery at UC San Francisco. He is also the Director of the Douglas Grant Cochlear Implant Center at UCSF and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Neurosurgery.

Dr. Limb received his undergraduate degree at Harvard University and his medical training at Yale University School of Medicine, followed by surgical residency and fellowship in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Center for Hearing Sciences at Johns Hopkins with Dr. David Ryugo studying the development of the auditory brainstem, and a second postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health studying neural mechanisms of musical improvisation and perception using functional neuroimaging methods. He was at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1996 to 2015, where he was Associate Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and a Faculty Member at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. He left in 2015 to join the UCSF Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Dr. Limb’s current areas of research focus on the study of the neural basis of musical creativity as well as the study of music perception in deaf individuals with cochlear implants. He is the past Editor-in-Chief of Trends in Amplification (now Trends in Hearing), the only journal explicitly focused on auditory amplification devices and hearing aids, and an Editorial Board member of the journals Otology and Neurotology and Music and Medicine. His work has received international attention and has been featured by National Public Radio, TED, National Geographic, the New York Times, PBS, CNN, Scientific American, the British Broadcasting Company, the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress, the Sundance Film Festival, Canadian Broadcasting Company, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the American Museum of Natural History.