Music, Mind, and Society

Music is as old as human history but, within the last decades, revolutionary scientific advances in psychology, genetics and brain imaging are making it possible to explore music and its effects in our lives in dramatically new ways. Studies in music cognition include listening, remembering, performing, learning, and composing music, as well as movement and dance. Behavioral studies and neuroimaging provide a window into the brain basis of music behaviors and their role in language and learning. Research on music and the mind at Vanderbilt is advancing this knowledge base across multiple disciplines, including psychology, neuroscience, medicine, education, and music performance. Discoveries and best practices could especially benefit persons with conditions as diverse as ADHD, anxiety, autism and other developmental disorders, brain injury, cancer, dementia, depression, genetic disorders, mental illness, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and stroke.

News items related to the topic: Music, Mind, and Society

Musicians not only hear in tune, they also see in tune
Musicians not only hear in tune, they also see in tune

Aug. 1 Vanderbilt Music & Mind Kickoff highlights the science of music
The 2015 Conference of the Society of Music Cognition & Perception (SMPC) will begin on Saturday, Aug. 1, with the Vanderbilt Music & Mind Kickoff to SMPC, open to the public from 1:00-7:00 p.m.at Ingram Hall, located at Vanderbilt University’s Blair School of Music, 2400 Blakemore Ave., Nashville.

New program set to explore effects of music on the mind
New program set to explore effects of music on the mind

Special Lecture: "Musical Rhythm and Language Development"
Special Lecture: "Musical Rhythm and Language Development"

Researchers explore links between grammar, rhythm
A child’s ability to distinguish musical rhythm is related to his or her capacity for understanding grammar, according to a recent study by Reyna Gordon, Ph.D., a research fellow in the Department of Otolaryngology and the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center.

Musicians not only hear in tune, they also see in tune
New News Item

Science of music comes alive at 2015 Society of Music Perception and Cognition Conference
Musicians and scientists connected in Music City USA at the 2015 biennial meeting of the Society of Music Perception and Cognition (SMPC) Conference and the Vanderbilt Music and Mind Kickoff. Music researchers from around the globe flew into Nashville Aug. 1-5 to attend the biennial conference.

Science of Song symposium set for Sept. 12 at Vanderbilt
Presentations illustrating ongoing research on how and why music affects us will be the focus of The Science of Song symposium at Vanderbilt University.

Web pages related to the topic: Music, Mind, and Society

  • Program for Music, Mind & Society at Vanderbilt
    Music is as old as human history but, within the last decades, revolutionary scientific advances in psychology, genetics and brain imaging are making it possible to explore music and its effects in our lives in dramatically new ways. Studies in music cognition include listening, remembering, performing, learning, and composing music, as well as movement and dance. Behavioral studies and neuroimaging provide a window into the brain basis of music behaviors and their role in language and learning. Research on music and the mind at Vanderbilt is advancing this knowledge base across multiple disciplines, including psychology, neuroscience, medicine, education, and music performance.

Studies related to the topic: Music, Mind, and Society

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People related to the topic: Music, Mind, and Society

Emelyne Bingham
Senior Lecturer in the Teaching of Music

Blythe A. Corbett, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology

Elisabeth Dykens, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Pediatrics; Co-Director, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities

Roland Eavey, M.D.
Guy M. Maness Chair and Professor of Otolaryngology; Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology; Professor of Hearing & Speech Sciences; Director, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center

Reyna L. Gordon, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and Psychology
Director, Music Cognition Lab
Associate Director, Program for Music, Mind and Society at Vanderbilt

Sasha Key, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Hearing & Speech Sciences and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences; Associate Director, IDDRC Translational Neuroimaging Core C; Director, VKC Psychophysiology Lab

Miriam Lense, Ph.D.
Research Instructor in Otolaryngology

Sohee Park, Ph.D.
Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of Psychology; Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Medicine, Health & Society

Mark Wallace, Ph.D.
Louise B. McGavock Endowed Chair; Professor of Hearing & Speech Sciences, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Psychology; Dean, Vanderbilt University Graduate School; Associate Director, Vanderbilt Conte Center for Neuroscience Research

David Zald, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

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