Sickle cell disease

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells that contain mostly hemoglobin* S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin. Sometimes these red blood cells become sickle-shaped (crescent shaped) and have difficulty passing through small blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can reach that part of the body. Tissue that does not receive a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the complications of sickle cell disease. There is currently no universal cure for sickle cell disease. Health maintenance for patients with sickle cell disease starts with early diagnosis, preferably in the newborn period and includes penicillin prophylaxis, vaccination against pneumococcus bacteria and folic acid supplementation. Treatment of complications often includes antibiotics, pain management, intravenous fluids, blood transfusion and surgery all backed by psychosocial support. Like all patients with chronic disease patients are best managed in a comprehensive multi-disciplinary program of care.

News items related to the topic: Sickle cell disease

Clinical & Translational Research Lecture: "Neurocognitive Deficits in Children with Chronic Illness: Prospects for Intervention"
Clinical & Translational Research Lecture: "Neurocognitive Deficits in Children with Chronic Illness: Prospects for Intervention"

People related to the topic: Sickle cell disease

Bruce Compas, Ph.D.
Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Psychology and Human Development; Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Psycho-Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Lori Jordan, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Neurology, Division of Pediatric Neurology

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