Cancer

Cancer develops when cells in a part of the body begin to grow out of control. Although there are many kinds of cancer, they all start because of out-of-control growth of abnormal cells. Cancer cells develop because of damage to DNA. This substance is in every cell and directs all activities. Most of the time when DNA becomes damaged the body is able to repair it. In cancer cells, the damaged DNA is not repaired. People can inherit damaged DNA, which accounts for inherited cancers. More often, though, a person's DNA becomes damaged by exposure to something in the environment, e.g., smoking.

Grants related to the topic: Cancer

People related to the topic: Cancer

Bruce Compas, Ph.D.
Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Psychology and Human Development; Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Psycho-Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Mary Jo Gilmer, Ph.D., R.N.
Professor of Nursing; Professor of Pediatrics

Andrew Link, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology; Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

James A McKanna, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Emeritus

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