Math disabilities and instruction

Students whose learning disabilities center around arithmetic functioning are called dyscalculic. This problem involves an inability to perform basic math functions (i.e., addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) or to apply those operations to daily situations. Sometimes the problem is in understanding the abstract concepts of mathematical usage.

Upcoming events related to the topic: Math disabilities and instruction

Educational Neuroscience Lecture: "Number Symbols in Brain and Mind"
Educational Neuroscience Lecture: "Number Symbols in Brain and Mind"

Studies related to the topic: Math disabilities and instruction

Click on the study title below to receive contact information, brochures and more in-depth information.

Grants related to the topic: Math disabilities and instruction

  • Archiving Data From Large-Scale fMRI Studies of Math and Reading Development
    PI: Booth, James
  • Improving Reading and Mathematics Outcomes for Students with Learning Disabilities: Next Generation Intensive Interventions
    PI: Fuchs, Douglas
  • Preventing and Understanding Mathematics Disability
    PI: Fuchs, Lynn
  • Word Problems, Language, and Comorbid Learning Disabilities
    PI: Fuchs, Lynn
  • Promoting Math Problem Solving and Reading Comprehension Via Language
    PI: Fuchs, Lynn
  • Embedding Working Memory Training within Math Problem Solving Intervention
    PI: Fuchs, Lynn

People related to the topic: Math disabilities and instruction

James Booth, Ph.D.
Patricia & Rodes Hart Chair and Professor of Psychology & Human Development

Douglas Fuchs, Ph.D.
Nicholas Hobbs Chair and Professor of Special Education and Professor of Pediatrics; Co-Director, National Center for Leadership in Intensive Intervention (NCLii)

Lynn S. Fuchs, Ph.D.
Dunn Family Chair in Psychoeducational Assessment and Professor of Special Education; Co-Director, National Center for Leadership in Intensive Intervention (NCLii)

Gavin Price, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology & Human Development

Bethany Rittle-Johnson, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology

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