Williams syndrome

Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition (estimated to occur in 1/7,500 births) that causes medical and developmental problems. Williams syndrome is associated with an unusual pattern of strengths and weaknesses in linguistic and cognitive profiles, as well as intellectual disability. It is present at birth and affects males and females equally. It can occur in all ethnic groups and has been identified in countries throughout the world.

News items related to the topic: Williams syndrome

Campers meet Carrie Underwood, Rascal Flatts during 2016 ACM Lifting Lives Music Camp
The Academy of Country Music (ACM) Lifting Lives and the Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VKC UCEDD) hosted the seventh annual ACM Lifting Lives Music Camp June 23-29, bringing a week of smiles and unforgettable experiences to campers with Williams syndrome.

Feels like home: ACM LL Music Campers at World Games
Sharing a love of music is one way in which individuals with Williams syndrome excel, as ACM Lifting Lives Music Campers showed when they performed with County Music artist Hunter Hayes during the recent Special Olympics World Games in Los Angeles (LA).

Web pages related to the topic: Williams syndrome

Studies related to the topic: Williams syndrome

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People related to the topic: Williams syndrome

Elisabeth Dykens, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and Pediatrics; Co-Director, Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities

Miriam Lense, Ph.D.
Research Instructor in Otolaryngology

Elizabeth Roof, M.A.
Senior Research Specialist, Prader-Willi Syndrome and Williams Syndrome Research Projects

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